ABOUT THIS CAMPAIGN
UPDATE: While SA and NSW have indicated they have heard us and will not pursue a Clean Air Tax, Victoria is pushing ahead regardless. Take action in VIC here.

While the rest of the world is offering incentives to transition drivers to electric cars, South Australia is set to become the first government in the world to tax them.
Victoria has announced they will join them and NSW wants to quickly follow suit.


Transport emissions are dangerous to human health -- especially to children -- contributing to more deaths each year than car accidents.

The sooner we get more electric cars and vehicles on the road, the sooner we'll clean up our air. That's a safer community for all of us.

Cost is often the biggest barrier to someone purchasing an electric car. A new tax will only make that worse, slowing their uptake. That stifles new, clean industry and keeps our air dirtier for longer.
    MORE INFORMATION
    Health Impacts
    Causes of death from transport emissions include lung diseases, asthma, lung cancer and infections like pneumonia. Because the tiny particles from emissions get into the bloodstream, they also contribute to heart disease and diabetes.
    Impacts on Children
    Transport pollution and proximity to roads are linked to the prevalence of asthma and allergies -- the most common cause of doctor visits for children under five.
    Safer Climate
    The transition to electric vehicles is critical to achieving South Australia, NSW and Victoria's targets of net zero emissions by 2050 and reducing the impacts of extreme weather.
    Incentives Not Taxes
    Because of the clear health, environmental and economic benefits, many countries are providing large subsidies, rebates and tax benefits for purchasing electric cars -- not punitive taxes.
    New Industry
    New investment and job growth from clean industries are critical to our economic recovery from Covid. Punitive new taxes stifle investment, growth and innovation.
    FAQ
    I pay for road upkeep, shouldn't electric vehicles too?
    Electric vehicles already contribute more in government revenue when compared to a typical family car. They pay Stamp Duty, sometimes the luxury car tax, and GST is higher because EVs are more expensive. Every electric vehicle that replaces a combustion engine car delivers an $8,763 net benefit to the economy over a ten-year life span, including the $1370 benefit to government revenue.

    In other words, not only do electric vehicle owners pay more towards road maintenance than if they bought a petrol/diesel car, but the more electric vehicles bought the more revenue would be available for governments to spend on roads. (Source: Ernst & Young, Uncovering the hidden costs and benefits from Electric Vehicles)
    Do other countries charge an electric vehicle tax?
    😂 of course not! This would be a world first. Every other developed country does the opposite, and offers massive incentives for people to buy electric cars -- the average is about $10,000. That's because every other country realises we must transition to a zero emissions future, and in fact many are moving towards a ban on new petrol/diesel car sales. Here in Australia, because we have no incentives, we have the lowest uptake rate for electric vehicles in the developed world. With a clean air tax added to the mix, that will put us further behind the rest of the world who are moving forward not backwards.
    Aren't electric vehicles just as bad for the environment?
    Battery Electric Vehicles have zero exhaust emissions, so that alone makes them better for the environment than an internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV).

    Research shows that even if an EV is charged by coal-fired electricity, it still generates lower net emissions that ICEVs.

    EV batteries can be used well after their EV end-of-life. Vehicle manufacturers and private companies are leading the charge in battery recycling and repurposing, ensuring that zero emissions vehicles really have a low impact to the environment.
    How will we replace the lost revenue from fuel excise?
    As Australia and the world transition to electric vehicles revenue from fossil fuel cars will need to be replaced. A national, fair approach to taxes is needed - not 7 different taxes depending on which State you live in. Every electric vehicle that replaces a combustion engine car delivers an $8,763 net benefit to the economy over a ten-year life span, including the $1370 benefit to government revenue.

    Why would a state government want to tax clean air?
    The Federal Government is who collects the fuel excise and other car taxes. State governments are facing budget crises thanks to the economic conditions of 2020, and are desperate to generate revenue - that is why many are selling off state assets. By getting a tax on electric vehicles rushed through before many people drive electric vehicles, they are hoping to cash in on an electric vehicle boom. The only problem is, with a clean air tax stopping many people from making the transition to electric vehicles, that boom may never come -- and the states will have no revenue from it.
    Why is an electric vehicle tax a bad idea?
    A new Clean Air Tax will keep our air dirtier for longer, damage our climate and our health.
    Bad for our air quality
    Approximately 1715 deaths were attributable to transport emissions each year in Australia according to a Melbourne University's Energy Institute study in 2017. This means more people are killed by dirty car emissions than car accidents each year.
    Bad for our children
    Transport pollution and proximity to roads are linked to the prevalence of asthma and allergies -- the most common cause of doctor visits for children under five. Because the tiny particles get into the bloodstream, they contribute to heart disease and diabetes. Causes of death from transport emissions include lung diseases, asthma, lung cancer and infections like pneumonia.

    Bad for our climate
    To achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2050 Australia has only 15 years to get electric vehicles from 0.6% to 100% of new cars sold. Given they are only projected to reach 21% of car sales by 2030, that's a significant challenge made only harder by a big new tax.
    Bad for fair taxation
    Electric vehicles already contribute more in government revenue when compared to a typical family car. They pay Stamp Duty, GST, and in some cases the luxury car tax. They contribute more tax revenue for road maintenance than a traditional petrol/diesel car.
    Bad for innovation
    Australian governments have already killed off the entire petrol/diesel car manufacturing industry in Australia. We have the opportunity to begin a new Australian car manufacturing industry by building electric vehicles, and the batteries, parts, charging stations and other infrastructure that supports them. Only a short-sighted government kills off an innovative industry.